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Just want to know if people  will paint and Post those minis here ? 

I will looking forward to paint my minis but it will be the first time for me 

anyone will give tips .. tricks ... paint to use for special colors... like the Venom for bane or those kinds of thing ? 

Just wondering where to begin? is their a "shop" online that's better than another, better paint ? better primer? 
what are the steps for painting a mini  ? I watch Youtube video a lot... but I would really like some people to talk to about that! 

 

Sry if my english is messed up  not my Initial language! 

Thanks Guys! 🙂 

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There are almost as many ways to paint as there are painters!

 

We've all got our little quirks.

 

If you haven't painted before, I would suggest getting a starter kit or two (possibly from different companies) and giving it a go.  You can find some inexpensive minis out there, so that you don't have to worry much about "messing up" an important figure.  Sometimes even regular plastic toys (like the animals in a Safari "Toob") will work for practice.

 

I use Reaper paints, but lots of folks use GW's line or Vallejo.  Others aren't very concerned about brand at all.  I've also seen person after person swear to the quality of Scale 75's metallic paints.  I've used both specific miniature paint and craft paint.  I definitely recommend sticking to miniature paint.  From what I gather, there isn't much difference in terms of quality between the major paint brands.  So it will come down to personal preference most of the time.

 

I also recommend getting a decent brush.  You don't need anything fancy to start with, but cheap synthetic brushes do not work as well as something even a little more expensive.  After you've painted for a time and can keep a brush in good working order for a decent amount of time, then it's time to start thinking about the expensive brushes.

 

When it comes to YouTube, or if I just want to feel bad about the quality of my painting, I recommend Sorastro's channel.  He does a lot of minis, and he's incredibly good.  Even the wife likes to watch him work and she's not "one of us."

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I can share my experience as someone who just started painting minis a couple years ago. I’m no expert, and I paint for the game table, not a display case. I’ve posted a lot of pics here on the Overlord, of the Conan minis I have painted. I still have lots to learn, but I’ll copy and paste a write up that I made for my nephews below:

——————————————

 

Start by watching some simple, beginners tutorials on YouTube. Watching a really advanced painter doing a tutorial on expert-level painting can actually scare you away from trying to paint your own minis. Like watching a high-end cooking show with top chefs will make someone afraid to try cooking!

 

First, many people recommend washing the minis to remove any chemical agents used to get them out of the moulds at the factory. Since the minis often have a bent arm, base, or spear/weapon, I choose to give all minis a quick dip in near boiling water. They don’t need much, just 5-10 seconds or less. It fixes bent shapes and cleans the mini. Let them dry completely. 

 

Primer. I use a simple spray can of white primer, like you can get at any hardware store. Make sure that it works on plastic. I occasionally use black primer for specific reasons, but you can’t go wrong with white primer. Spray outdoors! Or in a dedicated workshop with professional ventilation. Consider wearing a simple respirator or face mask. Arrange the minis on a piece of cardboard with even spacing between them all. Spray a coat of primer from all four directions. Many people say to spray just a light coat, but I like a solid primer layer (not TOO thick though!)... My minis look pure white when I’m done, others have the bare plastic color showing through the primer a bit. You’ll figure out what works for you. Humidity and extreme heat or cold will affect how the spray goes on. Follow the directions on the can. 

 

Next, get a comfortable place to sit, with good bright lighting. I like a simple table lamp with an adjustable neck so you can place the light right where you want. I also like a ‘white’ fluorescent or LED light, as opposed to many home lamps which are yellowish in color. 

 

Get a set of decent brushes with varying tip sizes (including a few very fine small tips) at a craft store, or on Amazon, or wherever. I personally don’t spend very much on brushes, and I feel you can get some good options without spending a lot. But get a decent brand meant for miniatures, not a generic pack of paint brushes. 

 

Painting... You need some paint. Most craft store stuff isn’t good enough. Get a set of miniature paints in small bottles. Again, I haven’t ever gone crazy with paint options. You’ll spend $40/$50 for a basic set, but it’ll last for a LONG time if you don’t waste paint. There are a lot of great, affordable pre-packaged paint kits available and I have had success working with a very small assortment of colors. This will force you to start getting good at mixing specific colors you need.  A lot of the impact of a nice looking mini comes from choosing good colors. With a basic set of white, black, and primary colors (red, blue, green, yellow) you can mix a HUGE variety of colors. Add in a few other tones and brightness options, and the possibilities are endless!... As for brands, I really like Vallejo. Currently  I use the Vallejo Basic USA Colors with 16 colors. Vallejo goes on so silky smooth that I rarely ever ‘thin’ the paint with water. Let dry totally. Like, hours or even a day or so. 

 

Next up, the shade layer. Ink Shaders are a thin, watery liquid that comes in different colors and darkness/strengths. Get a basic set. I have an Army Painter set that has been great, and wasn’t too expensive on Amazon. That one set has lasted for 100’s of minis. The real dirty secret with mini painting is that the shading step can do a LOT of the work. Especially for beginners. If you get the basic colors on a mini (the hands and face are flesh colored, clothing it’s own colors, swords and guns another metallic paint color), you’ll be shocked what a simple coat of shader will do! It fills in all the details by gathering as a dark shadow in all the recessed areas of the figure. It is my favorite step of the process. It is like turning the focus ring on a camera, suddenly your mini takes on a lifelike appearance.

 

Once fully dry, spray with Testors Matte (Lusterless) Lacquer. Often called Dulcote.  I cannot recommend any other brand. It is worth the cost for the small cans of Testors Dulcote. Look close at what you are buying, you generally want a matte finish, usually not a glossy one. I found that generic varnish and also Citadel Purity Seal can ruin all the work that’s been done. Sorry to say, Citadel makes good paint (although I don’t like the tubs it comes in), but the Purity Seal ruined several of my minis by making them look dull, faded, and frosty. I’ll always stick with Dulcote. 

 

One item from Citadel that I CAN recommend: Blood for the Blood God. If you want to add blood to a mini, it’s the best. I put it on after the matte sealer varnish step. Also, Citadel Ardcote is great for making things look glossy and wet. 

 

In the end, you’ll figure out what you like, don’t be afraid to make mistakes. It’s a learning process, and you CAN always strip the paint off if you need to start over. If that happens, Engine Degreaser works miracles, and can strip a mini to bare plastic after a 10-15 minute soak and a little scrubbing with a toothbrush. After doing that, don’t put the toothbrush back in your mouth... And don’t eat Tide Pods either. 😉 Always test a solvent before using it on precious minis.

 

Maybe start out by painting some minis from a game you don’t play much anymore. Instead of learning with a game you are really in love with. The best practice for me was painting 100’s of zombies from Zombicide. It’s hard to mess up a zombie! If you do a bad job, just cover it in lots of blood... 🙂

 

It’s such an enjoyable, relaxing, and rewarding hobby. So have fun and give it a try.... Good luck!

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One note on the ‘hot water’ method of washing and reshaping the minis: Some minis have a plastic base that is not the same PVC plastic that the mini itself is made from. I don’t know about Batman, but some of the big miniatures from Conan and Mythic Battles are glued to a rigid plastic base. Very hot water can warp some types of plastic! So be aware... 

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All good advice above. I posted another article on Forced Shadow here, I recommend reading it for color theory of what your doing. How much you use forced shadow is a choice, but the inking in the crevices is the minimal amount.

 

SImple painting steps:

 

1) Thin your paints. Not to the point that they just run out of control. Using medium matte thinner is probably the best option. Also you don't need a lot of paint this way either. Tiny drops are usually sufficient unless the area to cover is really large or doing multiple minis.

2) Start with the biggest innermost areas and work outward doing a broad pass. Detailing comes at the end.

3) For the broad areas that need gradient pick 3 colors or shades. You can even just take one shade and mix up with a bit of black and down with a bit of white. Use these colors to *quickly* paint in areas with proper shade. Don't worry about clean lines or getting 100% correct. If you did (1) above, they will blend on their own. Wait a minute or so, and see how their blending. Touch up the areas with light and dark. Maybe even keep a brush for feathering the colors together.

4) With broad areas done, paint all the details their neutral colors.

5) Now apply inks. Shade corners, cracks, all the details. Think about how shadows fall under details. Use a lot of black on metals. Also when inking, it's better to put it where you want carefully than to just slop it on. However, for a beginner slopping it on actually works out okay. You can pull ink off if you wash and dry a brush on a paper towel. The dry brush will pull ink out. Move it around till it's where you want it. A few areas will be problems of pulling too much ink in. You'll have to figure out a solution for those--usually painting back up to neutral colors. 

6) Dry brush furs (or metals) and hairs with lighter color.

7) Now using really thin white and your finest brush, bring back details where needed.

 

For your first one I recommend picking one that has broad areas and little details (i.e., not the Conan minis). Painting up a cloak or fur, or the broad skin of an ogre or troll is a great way to start. Monsters are more forgiving.  

 

Now, if you totally mess up--it's completely okay! Just soak the mini in pine sol overnight and scrub with a toothbrush and soap and boom, you can try again. Or you can just keep layering over the top--that works too.

 

Tips for getting better.

 

1) Take pictures of your mini with a cell phone. Look at details. What worked? What didn't.

2) Look at professional pictures and see if you can figure out how to approach what they did.

3) Look at similar things in real life and notice the color gradients.

4) Learn basing techniques.

5) Experiment with more exotic paints (translucent and textures).

6) By ALL means have fun. It's for your enjoyment and whatever you do is yours.

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Form my own experience.

 

I first started to learn how to paint with the Battle Games in Middle Earth series from Deagostini. It was a great way to learn how to paint. You got one painting workshop every two weeks (with either 12 plastic or 1 tin figure). I would sugest that was the nicesest way to learn how to paint. Step by step. 

 

When you paint your first mini, be glad if you paint 'within in the lines' with all flat collors. If you get the hang of that than start by aplying washes to you mini's. After that try drybrushing. After that highlighting. How I used to paint my mini's was: undercoat (black), basic collor, wash, and first highlights and when needed second highlights. Most of the time that will give a pretty desent mini (by my standaards anyway). 

 

What paints to start with depend on the troops you are going to paint. Always buy either black or white as udercoat layers. If you are using natural collors, 2 shades of brown and 1 wash of brown, 2 shades of green and one wash of green. Further for faces 2 shades of face collor and flesh wash and last but not least a metal collor (and if you want it fancy a black wash for the metal collor). So about 12 paints would be the basics I think. 

 

An other tip I would give is to start with the 'real' thing. It motivates you more to do your best on the one model. And if you screw up you can always paint over it later or even start over all together after stripping away the paint. But do begin with the less important models so that when you get to the important models you already have some skill. 

 

One last tip, start with a project and finnish it before buying new miniatures! It will save you a lot of money. I still have got some Lord of the Rings Models I need to paint... I have recently started painting those again to get in to the mood to paint the batman miniatures and the mythic battles pantheon miniatures. And read all the other comments there are some mighty good tips in there form far better painters than me.

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Thank you Very much guys for those advices 
Just a question for Epaka , u talk about the Shader ..

quote: Next up, the shade layer. Ink Shaders are a thin, watery liquid that comes in different colors and darkness/strengths. Get a basic set. I have an Army Painter set that has been great, and wasn’t too expensive on Amazon. That one set has lasted for 100’s of minis. The real dirty secret with mini painting is that the shading step can do a LOT of the work. Especially for beginners. If you get the basic colors on a mini (the hands and face are flesh colored, clothing it’s own colors, swords and guns another metallic paint color), you’ll be shocked what a simple coat of shader will do! It fills in all the details by gathering as a dark shadow in all the recessed areas of the figure. It is my favorite step of the process. It is like turning the focus ring on a camera, suddenly your mini takes on a lifelike appearance.

 

the Ink Shaders are apply after my mini is fully painted right? 
Do I just put the "ink Shaders" all over the mini to cover all of the parts?(arms , clothing, weapons.. etc) 

I will look at the Youtube channel u suggest 

For the pratice I bought the Reaper Mini Core Skills for Basecoat Washing and Drybrushing (cpmes with 3 minis that I can pratice on) , didnt try it yet (are u famillair with it? )

want to know.. is it essential to do the Drybrushing ? is this the same thing as the "ink Shader" u mentionned above? 

thanks alot guys! 

 


 

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Simplest method: just dunk the whole mini with all areas painted flat in black ink. Some folks are quite happy with just doing this and moving on. It does turn the whole miniature darker, so you want to use lighter shades than you intend for the final. It's also called "slop and go." From your questions, I don't think this your intent, you seem curious to learn.

 

Better slower method: layer appropriate colored ink along all the lines of shadow under crevices using a 000 brush after filling in areas.

 

Is it essential to drybrush? A better question to ask is it essential to highlight? Highlighting areas can be done via multiple methods. Dry brushing is very destructive to a brush, but quickly gives a highlight to an area. One can also use really super thin white or near white paint to highlight an area and feather the edges. Not as destructive, but takes more effort and the results tend to look better. But not always, sometimes dry brushing texture is perfect for what you want. Try both and see how they work.

 

I tend to do all flat paints, gradients for broad areas. Then ink. Then highlight (occasionally dry brushed). Then touch up till I'm happy. Others suggested watching some videos that walk you through a mini. Zarastro on youtube does this for a lot of common miniatures. Follow along with his instructions and do a few. You'll get the hang of it, and eventually develop a feel for just how thin is the right amount and what color works where. 

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Thanks @BertD, and happy to try my best at an answer. Everyone paints differently, and for sure some high level professionals paint very differently than me. But from my perspective, the shader step is a huge and essential part of my mini painting.

Yes, generally speaking, you paint all of the basic colors you want on the mini, and then you use the ink shader on top of the paint, after the paint has dried. The technique that you use can vary quite a bit. I first learned about mini painting from a video showing someone using the ‘dip’ technique. Literally, a painted mini would be entirely dipped into a cup filled with ink shader, and then, using a paper towel, the excess shader would be wiped off of the mini. I don’t use this technique anymore, but it can be very fast and effective if you are trying to paint 100 matching minis for a big wargame or something. Otherwise, you’d use a brush to ‘paint’ the ink shader onto the mini, letting the shader seep into the cracks and crevices of the sculpture, while keeping the shader from going on too thick. The easiest and most efficient way is to just go over the painted mini entirely with a certain tone of shader. I do a lot of my minis like that. Get the colors in place, and then hit the whole thing with a dark shader. It’s easy and effective. 

Going beyond that, many painters with more skill and experience will be incredibly artful in how they apply shaders. They might use certain flesh colors to only shade the skin, and other colors for different parts of the clothes, and yet another color for the weapons or other details. For example, they might use a very dark blue shader for some chainmail, and then a lighter brown shader for a fur cape.  You can go as simple, or as complex, as you like. You might paint basic colors, apply some shader, and then apply more paint after that, perhaps using the dry-brush technique. Dry brushing is almost exactly what it sound like. It’s a more advanced technique wherein you use a brush that has not been wetted down with water, and get just a small amount of paint on it, and carefully apply very light strokes to get a soft and graduated color effect on certain areas. It is often used to apply highlights. So, you might paint Batman’s cape a basic blue, then apply a dark blue shader to fill in the folds and details, and then after that apply some light blue drybrushing to give the cape some brighter highlights. 

Be aware that applying shaders will darken the entire paintjob. So, many of us will actually paint the base colors much brighter than we actually want them, knowing that the shader will eventually darken the paint job quite a bit.

For me, miniature painting is all about practicing, having fun with it, being proud of the work, not worrying too much about perfection, being open to learning new skills, and getting those minis on the gaming table!!!

Best of luck!

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Just remember these golden rules:

 

1) Relax, take it easy and have fun.

2) Try 1 or 2 new techniques at a time and don't be afraid to experiment.

3) There will be times when what you did doesn't work for you. It's no big deal, you can keep painting over unless it's so thick it's lost detail and then you can strip.

4) Thin your paints.

5) When in doubt see (1).

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thanks a lot guys, really helpful , I start painting tonight for the first time , Went pretty well

Had fun with my wife .. 

Just wondering... is their any  "type" of Painting that does a better job for Exemple : "superhero theme" of "Zombie Theme" "Comic Book theme" etc.. 

or Can i do all of this with Basic  vallejo paint or something like that? 

thanks for all of those advice , u guys rock! 🙂

 

EDIT: I will definitely Posted my painted Batman Minis Here! 😄

 

Edited by BertD
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Any set of quality paints is just a collection of colors and potential colors, which can be used to create any kind of ‘style’... How you choose to paint your minis is up to you.  The same miniature will look very different based on who painted it. Just look at the thread on this website called ‘Show your Conan’, you’ll see a lot of different styles applied to the same miniature. Some are stylized, some are realistic, some look like a photograph of the lifelike thing, some look like a comic book illustration. 

Just keep painting and find your own style... and share your work here! 

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I grew up in a print shop and used to mix inks for colors. My wife has banned me from discussion on color theory, but since you brought it up... Having more colors is easier to reproduce without mixing some folks get a "wet palette" so they can mix up colors and have them over a few sessions. All you need in a mixing pigments (a subtractive color system) is white, black, cyan, magenta and yellow. Metallics are specials because they actually contain flecks of metal so those have to be bought outside the mixing system. There are greens which we don't have pigments to reproduce but those colors are not common unless you work in a metallic chem lab oxidizing metals. However, to reliably mix colors from that you'll need a color mixing guide and those surprisingly aren't cheap. Also surprising, most pigment sets don't have cyan and magenta which is weird. There's this antiquated idea that red, blue and yellow can mix anything which is bunk (red, green and blue can in an additive system i.e. mixing light beams). 

 

All that said, I would get a set that had at minimum the basics white, black, cyan, magenta, yellow, metallics. Then round out with commonly used paints dark flesh, light flesh,  leather, earth, natural tones, and some oranges, reds, greens, blues to round it out. I prefer the little squeeze bottles with a tip. They keep better. Then the starter set of shade inks from Citadel is a great ink set.

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Oh, I just remembered something!

 

Start a notebook for your painting journey: which colors you like to use, how you mixed a particular shade, hints on certain techniques, etc.  Some folks go all the way and do swatch books, but I think that's a lot more ambition than I'm ever likely to have.

 

Also, if you have an Android phone or tablet, there's an app called "paintRack" out there that can really help out with paint inventory and planning your figures.  When I had first downloaded it, I was just fiddling with it a bit, and quickly decided that I was going to pay to unlock everything in it (mostly just for the extra storage space).  They plan to do an IOS version, but haven't gotten to it yet.

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Thank You Guys, for now I Just do my Shade ink by myself for the first miniatures... probably gonna go for the citadel Shade paint , I imagine that Citadel is a great Company for those Ink ? (base Kit, Layer kit etc..) eventually I'll need to buy some .. For Now I have the Reaper Starter Paint kit , is it better for me to stay with that type of paint?

 Where are u guys buying your Brushes?  (I need to buy on Internet) is their a Quality or a Type of Brushes I need to Avoid ? 

 

Really appreciate all of your Tips and tricks Guys! 😄
 

@Epaka I will Post my BGCC On here for sure! 🙂


Ill look for the App Strawhat , unfortunatly I dont have an Android , I'll wait for the IOS version . 

 

If you guys wanted to give your honest opinion on this and tell me what Can i do to be better , Feel Free 

Thanks have a Good night Folks! 😄

 

Orc.JPG

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In my experience, paint is (by and large) paint.  There are some differences, but they should be pretty comparable and compatible (for mixing).  Some folks are very brand loyal, others aren't.

 

As for brushes, I've seen folks swear by Rosemary & Co., but I'm still using Army Painter's "Character" brush (white handle) which is about $7 on their website (I get it a little cheaper from a local shop).  I use it for pretty much everything (from dotting eyes to painting large critters).  I would recommend avoiding synthetic bristles if possible.  The tip will start to curl after a few minis, and that can get frustrating to deal with.  I've heard of people getting years out of a good brush, but I'm happy if I can get a couple dozen minis out of one.  I'm hard on brushes, but I've learned to thoroughly rinse my brush after two or three dips in paint.  That's helped me lengthen my brush life.

 

I'd say that's a fine first mini, and far better than my first.  

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Another quick Question , I'm watching a lot of Video of Miniac and other youtubers.. Just wondering .. what type of Primer do you guys use? 
I don't have an Airbrush , i'm looking for an Aerosol can , miniac suggest Armory Black or White and Citadel Black Chaos...  

do I need to pay 30$ for a Primer or the one at Walmart for 8$ will do the tricks? 


Have a good night! 😄

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Nice work @BertD! Honestly, very good looking mini, particularly for a beginner. Your technique will only get better from here. The only thing I would note, is that it looks like he has a fur ‘skirt’ on, under his chainmail loincloth. It is hard to tell from the picture, but it looks like you painted the chainmail and the fur the same metallic color. I might have gone for a light brown on the fur part. That would make the chainmail stand out more perhaps? But that is a minor nitpick, you’ve done a good job. Hopefully you had fun painting him. 

As for brushes, I’m not the one to ask. I’ve mostly worked with pretty cheap, low quality brushes to be honest. Getting some better brushes has been on my list for awhile. 

As for primer, I’ve also been cheap. I’ve always used standard cans of white Rust-Oleum aerosol. It’s always worked fine for someone like me, who isn’t a master mini painter. Perhaps some of the really skilled mini artists on here will have some more insight than I do? @garbetsp? @Walrusboy77? Any thoughts?

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Excellent job on the mini!

 

I've had mixed results with primer. The expensive ones have disappointingly varied in quality from can to can (except for Citadel's which is excellent) and I've bought several of them and ended up throwing them away. The cheaper ones at the local hardware store seem to be more consistent and work just fine. The master mini painters generally use an airbrush to prime. My wife used to work with airbrushing and she doesn't want one in the house due to fumes. 😞

 

Red sable are the absolute best brushes for this. Otherwise, any cheap set will do. I've got almost all cheap brushes and a few red sables. If I buy any more it will be the red sable ones. 

 

Paint however, has a variety lot of grades. Most of the miniature lines are fairly the same (but price varies widely). The big cheap tubes at the craft store are a grade below, they seem rubbery and need a lot of thinning and the color washes out a bit as you thin (i.e. short on pigment, heavy on medium). The art supply stores sell the highest grade, but you have to mix all your own colors and mediums yourself so it's more of DIY of paint making. I prefer miniature lines in the dropper bottles just because they dispense a drop and don't dry out as fast.

 

We just may have to start a "Show your paint station" thread...

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Ya @Epaka I didnt realize it was Fur at the bottom of the Chainmail until it was too late ... I just let it be and skip to a next one, people always tell me to NOT being over perfectionism ... so... thanks for the great comments 

I'll go with you @garbetsp and check for the red sable and a couple of cheap brushes

 

 @Epaka i Saw a couple videos about the  Rust-Oleum aerosol , it has good reviews I'll surely try it before buying a Citadel One at 50$

I presume they have Grey White and Black primer..! :) 

for the paint I'll go for the Vallejo starter kit : https://www.amazon.ca/Vallejo-Basic-Colors-Paint-17ml/dp/B009162PWU

Thanks! 

 

 

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@garbetsp, thanks for the advice on the red sable brushes. I’m putting in an order for a set. $23 for a set of 7 detail brushes. Can’t complain about that price point. 

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21 hours ago, BertD said:

Another quick Question , I'm watching a lot of Video of Miniac and other youtubers.. Just wondering .. what type of Primer do you guys use? 
I don't have an Airbrush , i'm looking for an Aerosol can , miniac suggest Armory Black or White and Citadel Black Chaos...  

do I need to pay 30$ for a Primer or the one at Walmart for 8$ will do the tricks? 


Have a good night! 😄

 

For most minis, primer won't be a huge issue, but you need to watch out for Reaper's Bones line!  The plastic used for the Bones line doesn't always react well to primers, and can become sticky to the touch (and it won't "dry").  The best thing for Bones, if you even use primer on them, is what Reaper calls a "liner."  Brown works best, but the other colors are OK as well (the sepia and red aren't quite as durable as the brown, blue, and grey).

 

When in doubt, test the primer on the bottom of the base (taping the rest of the miniature) or a bit of sprue (if some is available).

 

I've not done any significant testing on spray primers, but the generally accepted wisdom is that there is very little difference between the generic cans and the branded.

Edited by strawhat
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53 minutes ago, strawhat said:

 

For most minis, primer won't be a huge issue, but you need to watch out for Reaper's Bones line!  The plastic used for the Bones line doesn't always react well to primers, and can become sticky to the touch (and it won't "dry").  The best thing for Bones, if you even use primer on them, is what Reaper calls a "liner."  Brown works best, but the other colors are OK as well (the sepia and red aren't quite as durable as the brown, blue, and grey).

 

When in doubt, test the primer on the bottom of the base (taping the rest of the miniature) or a bit of sprue (if some is available).

 

I've not done any significant testing on spray primers, but the generally accepted wisdom is that there is very little difference between the generic cans and the branded.

Okok, thank you. I probably won't have Reaper'S bone line after I paint my last one, I ordered the Learn to paint Kit , to test if I would like that or not ! 
Games like BGCC and okko Chronicles , Monumental , ReichBuster .. etc.. react well to Primer normally , its all plastic minis anyway right? 

 

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